Author Topic: STOCK SHOCK HATERS BEWARE!: Lowering the stock shock  (Read 890 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

October 08, 2020, 10:22:41 PMReply #15 on

Offline VABird (OP)

  • Tomcat
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • Posts: 154
  • Activity Meter:
    0.67%
  • nOObie
    • Jack-Be-Quick
  • LOCATION: United States
The ride might be fun, but in the great scheme of things, it's the destination that counts.
John 3:16

October 15, 2020, 02:43:16 PMReply #16 on

Offline HockleyBoy

  • Cool Cats
  • Bengal Tiger
  • *
  • Location: Essex, United Kingdom
  • Posts: 1025
  • Activity Meter:
    0.22%
05 Tiger Lucifer Orange (resting) 07 GSX-R1000TT K7 71 Triumph T25T 17 Tiger 1050 Sport

November 15, 2020, 06:07:12 PMReply #17 on

Offline Bixxer Bob

  • Cool Cats
  • Chatty Cathy
  • *
  • Location: Norfolk, England
  • Posts: 5930
  • Activity Meter:
    2%
  • I make the mistakes so you don't have to.....
  • LOCATION: Norfolk, England
Since the majority of forces on the shock are in line with the centreline, and in compression, this isn't as risky as it sounds, although it will be more prone to failure than a Hagon if the bottom bush isn't kept lubricated due to the twisting action in it seizes.  Sadly, there are a lot of Tigers out there where this vital maintenance is neglected.

Having said that, the only thing I would have done different would have been, instead of the epoxy locking the alignment for welding (a crackingly good idea btw) I'd have removed a little metal at a time, reassembling each time, until the two halves locked together on the tread when aligned.  That way the force is transmitted directly from the part to the shaft without trying to compress the weld and the epoxy.  A sort of belt and braces approach if you like, but in this fashion all the weld is really trying to do is stop the shock rotating.

Good luck with it,  I hope it keeps on holding together  :thumbsup
I don't want to achieve immortality through prayer, I want to achieve it through not dying...

November 15, 2020, 09:46:12 PMReply #18 on

Offline VABird (OP)

  • Tomcat
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • Posts: 154
  • Activity Meter:
    0.67%
  • nOObie
    • Jack-Be-Quick
  • LOCATION: United States
Since the majority of forces on the shock are in line with the centreline, and in compression, this isn't as risky as it sounds, although it will be more prone to failure than a Hagon if the bottom bush isn't kept lubricated due to the twisting action in it seizes.  Sadly, there are a lot of Tigers out there where this vital maintenance is neglected.

Having said that, the only thing I would have done different would have been, instead of the epoxy locking the alignment for welding (a crackingly good idea btw) I'd have removed a little metal at a time, reassembling each time, until the two halves locked together on the tread when aligned.  That way the force is transmitted directly from the part to the shaft without trying to compress the weld and the epoxy.  A sort of belt and braces approach if you like, but in this fashion all the weld is really trying to do is stop the shock rotating.

Good luck with it,  I hope it keeps on holding together  :thumbsup

That's why the Grease fitting was installed, so that is far easier.
http://tigertriple.com/forum/index.php/topic,16901.0.html

The two halves did fit perfectly when the threaded sections were bottomed out together. The epoxy simply locked the halves together. Somewhere in the procedure, I did state how lucky I got on the initial cutting, but I completely agree that this is very important.

7,000 + miles and still holding strong!
The ride might be fun, but in the great scheme of things, it's the destination that counts.
John 3:16