Author Topic: Dropping the front forks a bit...................................  (Read 8123 times)

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August 27, 2016, 07:14:55 AM on

Offline thebiglad (OP)

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Hi Guys, I've got a 2006 ally wheel model  with std. seat and suspension. She is just a tad too tall for comfort and I'm thinking of dropping the front end a small amount 10-15mm by pushing the fork legs up through the triple trees.

Any comments?
2006 Tiger 955i

August 27, 2016, 08:22:15 AMReply #1 on

Offline Timbox2

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Just be aware that Triumph decreased rake and trail on the ally wheel bikes which already makes them a quicker steering bike compared to the spoke wheel bikes, dropping the front even more and you have the potential for making it a bit twitchy on the straights. On the spoke wheel bikes you can reverse the rear adjuster eccentrics which levels it up, not possible on the ally wheel bikes though. Id try 10mm first, 15 is a fair drop
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August 27, 2016, 11:58:11 AMReply #2 on

Offline Chris Canning

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What Tim said,I get away with mine because I have a fat 17" tyre to lean on get doing the same on a bicycle 19" and your asking for trouble,plus the side stand will be difficult.

Start at 5mm and see how you go.

August 27, 2016, 04:57:18 PMReply #3 on

Offline Ossian

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If this was done on a wire wheel model would it result in a tendency for the bike to shake the head at speed ?

August 27, 2016, 08:40:17 PMReply #4 on

Offline Chris Canning

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It can depending on the situation,mine does when I'm one up which I find quite fun but others might find otherwise.

September 14, 2016, 08:47:02 PMReply #5 on

Offline GuyMoody

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Hi Guys, I've got a 2006 ally wheel model  with std. seat and suspension. She is just a tad too tall for comfort and I'm thinking of dropping the front end a small amount 10-15mm by pushing the fork legs up through the triple trees.

Any comments?

I have exactly the same year and wheels and when I bought the bike it had been lowered like this at a Triumph shop by the previous owner  (see the pic). I have never felt that the bike is twitchy and that little bit of height was never missed by me.

That said I am about to raise my bike back up again because I put a skid plate on and I want to restore some of the clearance for the rocky roads I ride. From what I see there are 4 bolts per side on the upper and lower clamps and it looks fairly simple to do. One word of caution though - I suggest loosening and then tightening each bold individually before you get really stuck in because if one strips and it is the 7th of 8 then you are in a bit of a mess and will be out of commission until the stripped one is fixed.
from the Wild Wet Coast of Canada

September 15, 2016, 07:05:46 AMReply #6 on

Offline thebiglad (OP)

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I have exactly the same year and wheels and when I bought the bike it had been lowered like this at a Triumph shop by the previous owner  (see the pic). I have never felt that the bike is twitchy and that little bit of height was never missed by me.

That said I am about to raise my bike back up again because I put a skid plate on and I want to restore some of the clearance for the rocky roads I ride. From what I see there are 4 bolts per side on the upper and lower clamps and it looks fairly simple to do. One word of caution though - I suggest loosening and then tightening each bold individually before you get really stuck in because if one strips and it is the 7th of 8 then you are in a bit of a mess and will be out of commission until the stripped one is fixed.

Hi Gus, thanks very much for the piccy and wise words. :>< Sounds like a job I need to do, with little or no downside. Time will tell eh? :hat10 :hat10

Cheers
Dave
2006 Tiger 955i

September 15, 2016, 11:56:59 AMReply #7 on

Offline Chris Canning

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I have exactly the same year and wheels and when I bought the bike it had been lowered like this at a Triumph shop by the previous owner  (see the pic). I have never felt that the bike is twitchy and that little bit of height was never missed by me.

That said I am about to raise my bike back up again because I put a skid plate on and I want to restore some of the clearance for the rocky roads I ride. From what I see there are 4 bolts per side on the upper and lower clamps and it looks fairly simple to do. One word of caution though - I suggest loosening and then tightening each bold individually before you get really stuck in because if one strips and it is the 7th of 8 then you are in a bit of a mess and will be out of commission until the stripped one is fixed.

Are you sure the shop did it because that is how they used to come in the crate and not the first time I've seen guys on net riding as such assuming it was stock,but Jeeze with the change of head angle at the factory and then dropping forks that much  :bug_eye even my wire wheel 955 was pretty drastic at 7/8mm in the days I had a 19" hoop.

September 15, 2016, 06:35:31 PMReply #8 on

Offline Dyn Blin

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September 15, 2016, 07:53:07 PMReply #9 on

Offline Chris Canning

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September 26, 2016, 01:58:27 PMReply #10 on

Offline thebiglad (OP)

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OK so today I got off my arse and did some work on the front forks. It took about an hour and needed a 6mm allen bit, a 6mm allen key, a cross-head screwdriver and a good hammer.



Supported the bike so the front wheel was safely of the ground and slackened all the 6 mm clamp bolts and the jubilee clips that secure the fork gaiters. Then gently tapped the fork leg lowers to push them up through the clamps until there was 15 mm showing through the top clamp.

Tightened up all the securing clamp screws (torquing them to 20n/m) and gaiter clips and put tools away.



Then went for a test ride through a series of bends. Perhaps a TINY difference in steering speed (really marginal and definitely nothing bad) BUT now I can put both feet down flat and feel much more confident with her. All the good stuff of a Tiger 955i without that tippy-toe, top heavy, out of control feel.

All good now.............................

Cheers
Dave
2006 Tiger 955i

September 28, 2016, 09:12:33 PMReply #11 on

Offline SilverTiger

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Dave, if you don't mind me asking, how tall are you? 
2006 silver Triumph Tiger 955i
1975 Triumph Bonneville T140
1972 Kawasaki 500 H1B - now restored, very orange
1999 Yamaha R1 - bought new

September 29, 2016, 07:30:19 AMReply #12 on

Offline thebiglad (OP)

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Dave, if you don't mind me asking, how tall are you?

Hi ST and no, I don't mind you asking at all. That's what we're for isn't it - to help each other?

I'm 6'1" but I'm a bit short in the leg (don't know for sure my inseam but guess at 31 or 32"). Since doing the modification I've been out three times on the bike and as ridiculous as it sounds, this 15mm drop has made all the difference. I no longer get apprehensive when approaching T-junctions, or stopping places in general (particularly gravelly ones) so the biking pleasure is fully back.

I did the job without removing any bodywork, but if you've got the front fairing off for any reason it makes accessing the lower clamp allen screws just that bit easier.
Cheers
Dave
2006 Tiger 955i

September 29, 2016, 10:07:28 AMReply #13 on

Offline JayDub

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If you haven't already you should consider lowering the rear too as the bike is now 'unbalanced' I did it the other way around and lowered the rear first then after it was pointed out to me I lowered the front, thats when I noticed the difference (improvement) in handling.  You can rotate the concentric adjusters 180° but add a spacer to raise the chain guard to save the chain wearing it, or  fit 10mm longer dog-bones.
"When I was younger I could remember anything, whether it happened, or not."

September 29, 2016, 12:47:08 PMReply #14 on

Offline Timbox2

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If you haven't already you should consider lowering the rear too as the bike is now 'unbalanced' I did it the other way around and lowered the rear first then after it was pointed out to me I lowered the front, thats when I noticed the difference (improvement) in handling.  You can rotate the concentric adjusters 180° but add a spacer to raise the chain guard to save the chain wearing it, or  fit 10mm longer dog-bones.

But, he hasnt got concentric adjusters, its the cast wheel Tiger, so only way to lower rear is with a different shock Im afraid.
2016 Tiger Sport