Author Topic: The new Tiger 900 engine  (Read 933 times)

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January 04, 2020, 10:42:06 PM on

Offline Ossian (OP)

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The new 888cc Tiger 900 is described as having a 'T' plane crank.
https://www.triumphmotorcycles.co.uk/motorcycles/adventure/tiger-900/reasons-to-ride
Can anybody explain this and tell us why it would be better than an even firing 120 deg triple ?

January 05, 2020, 06:48:16 PMReply #1 on

Offline Chris Canning

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Well Yamaha have been the first to seriously dip their toe in the water with their R1,instead of going the electrically software route for traction they have altered the firing order by changing the crank shaft the same as Yamaha and hence the firing order.

What you are seeing is Triumph starting to reap the benefits of contacts they have made with running engines in Moto2,but straight forward it might not be,if your not a follower of Moto GP Yamaha have struggle extracting topend power,something that has past all but unnoticed when Ducati went from their classic 1098/1198 long stroke cam belt motor to the Panigali big piston short stroke camchain it has been a bumpy ride in more ways the one.

But Triumphs 765 and the new 900 shows that they are really starting to make an effort and we now live in a world of short stroke/big bore and other variations.

January 06, 2020, 12:53:13 AMReply #2 on

Offline Ossian (OP)

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Hi Chris. The use of cross plane and flat plane cranks has a logic in engines with even numbers of cylinders. Usually to do with firing order or exhaust design requirements, but I don't understand the logic behind using a crank like this in a 3 cylinder engine. With a 'T' crank as Triumph calls it, you seem to have a 180 degree twin with an extra cylinder attached. Why ?
My only guess is that Triumph have considered and balanced each cylinder individually and then using this design created an engine such that firing is timed to give a 'Big Bang' effect for better traction ? This wouldn't be possible with a 120 degree design.

January 06, 2020, 06:48:41 PMReply #3 on

Offline Chris Canning

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What has passed a lot of folk by is Ducati’s transition from 1198 to Panigali in other words long stroke bottom end grunt with cam belt to big piston short stroke camchain it wasn’t/hasn’t been straight forward,I know guys who went that way and changed back.

When it comes to the Multistrada Ducati have bypassed the Pani motor and are going V4,my long winded reply is just another way of saying these things have to be tried will it work in the long run?? Who knows,but the one thing you can be sure of the game is moving on with other manufacturers and Triumph have to come up with solutions.


February 04, 2021, 06:32:39 PMReply #4 on

Offline blacktiger

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To answer the original question....the simple answer is the T plane crank gives the crank a longer rest between the firing of the cylinders. It used to be called a "Big Bang" engine when it was first introduced in two stroke 500 GPs. Its reason is the let the tyre calm down and grip the road/track again during the period when nothing is firing. The screamer engines were just spinning up the tyre and wearing them out whilst not pushing the bike forward.
So, on the Tiger900 it should give more grip on slippery dirt roads.
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February 04, 2021, 09:40:19 PMReply #5 on

Offline Chris Canning

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Looking at what Triumph launched the other day...just a matter of what other models that motor is going to be put.

February 05, 2021, 12:02:04 AMReply #6 on

Offline blacktiger

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Looking at what Triumph launched the other day...just a matter of what other models that motor is going to be put.

Won't go in anything else. I mean, did they use the 800 in anything else? Even though there was perhaps a market for an 800sprint type thing.
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February 05, 2021, 05:36:57 PMReply #7 on

Offline Chris Canning

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No way Triumph are going to the trouble of building that new 1200 motor for just one model, just a case of if they have balls to hold their corporate hands up about some of the crap decisions they made in recent years,and go the same route..as in successfully..of using the same motor in several bikes.

February 06, 2021, 01:32:56 PMReply #8 on

Offline blacktiger

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No way Triumph are going to the trouble of building that new 1200 motor for just one model, just a case of if they have balls to hold their corporate hands up about some of the crap decisions they made in recent years,and go the same route..as in successfully..of using the same motor in several bikes.

The 1200 is a different proposition to the 900. It's a flagship engine. Yes, I can see it in a "Sprint" as well. Not in a tourer though as that would require shaft drive. Tiger1200? I think not as that's better with the shaft drive. Thing is, Triumph don't have a huge model line up for the triples. So maybe they need to start thinking out of their comfort range.
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February 06, 2021, 03:30:57 PMReply #9 on

Offline Chris Canning

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Blimey don’t start me off with what Triumph have done regarding the Tiger, they went from the 955 too the 1050 and just sat on their corporate hands and did zilch, and then.......... turned up with the god awful shaft driven 1200 :rrr when some muppet at the company had ideas of turning themselves into an offshoot of BMW.

Both my X/R and KTM GT tour very nicely than you very much and not a shaft drive to be seen, yes I do have bikes with such but a necessity they ain’t, when you can put new chain and sprockets on a bike for less than 200 quid.

That new 170hp triple will sit very nicely in a modern day Tiger, welcome to the 21st century Triumph always knew Moto2 would drag you there in the end  :icon_biggrin:

February 07, 2021, 12:40:38 PMReply #10 on

Offline ghulst

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Won't go in anything else. I mean, did they use the 800 in anything else? Even though there was perhaps a market for an 800sprint type thing.


That really depends though. A Speed Triple with a 900 could be a nice offering. Or a Scrambler 900... Or a Trident. It could even be fun to stick one in a Thruxton. ;) Back to the modular Triumph days.

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February 07, 2021, 12:56:05 PMReply #11 on

Offline blacktiger

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That really depends though. A Speed Triple with a 900 could be a nice offering. Or a Scrambler 900... Or a Trident. It could even be fun to stick one in a Thruxton. ;) Back to the modular Triumph days.

Scramblers and Thruxtons are already twins and will stay so. I agree about the Trident but they've gone with the 660 for now. Would  a 900 version sell? Not many. You're then creeping into Street/Speed Triple territory.
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February 07, 2021, 08:42:36 PMReply #12 on

Offline Sin_Tiger

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Lightweight Tiger 660? I did see a video a few years ago of someone who'd put longer forks and rejigged the rear suspension on a gen1 Street Triple, actually looked OK and seemed to work in the rough but ally frame  :augie
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February 07, 2021, 08:48:43 PMReply #13 on

Offline ghulst

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I would not be surprised by a Tiger 660 (or a Scrambler 660 or 900). Or even a new version of the 660 that ends up around 400 for the Asian markets...
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February 23, 2021, 01:44:08 PMReply #14 on

Offline blacktiger

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I would not be surprised by a Tiger 660 (or a Scrambler 660 or 900). Or even a new version of the 660 that ends up around 400 for the Asian markets...

You won't find a triple in a "Scrambler". Any dirt capable Triumph with a triple in it will be a Tiger. Two distinct and separate model lines. I can't see a problem with a Tiger660 though. Would make a good entry level Tiger.
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