Author Topic: Tabitha 1200  (Read 4005 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

January 20, 2021, 09:15:15 PMReply #15 on

Offline Bixxer Bob

  • Auditor of Reality
  • Cool Cats
  • Chatty Cathy
  • *
  • Location: Norfolk, England
  • Posts: 6015
  • Activity Meter:
    1.11%
  • I make the mistakes so you don't have to.....
  • LOCATION: Norfolk, England
  • Bike model currently owned: 2013 Exploder
My guess is the real problem is the actual lock mechanism that pushes the two lugs into the neck of the tank, rather than the lock cylinder. But maybe you already know that. 

My approach would be lots of penetrative fluid (not WD40) via the lock cylinder so that it permeated down into the mechanism .   Then heat it with a hot air paint stripper, being careful not to heat the paintwork. Use a wet towel or similar. Then apply firm pressure on the filler cap so that you remove the friction of the tank neck while starting to attempt to wiggle it free.

I've picked locks, you aren't going to gain much from that idea.
I don't want to achieve immortality through prayer, I want to achieve it through not dying...

January 21, 2021, 09:58:37 AMReply #16 on

Offline ghulst

  • Administrator
  • Cheetah
  • *****
  • Location: South-West Netherlands
  • Posts: 525
  • Activity Meter:
    9.33%
  • Roar!
    • arnehulstein.nl
  • LOCATION: Netherlands
  • Bike model currently owned: Triumph Tiger 800 XC '12
As I was reading this, I was wondering whether you couldn't just remove the filler cap altogether. I thought it was one with hex bolts around it? Or is that not the case on this model?

Also, you can get pliers to get the brake cylinders out, but another one would be air pressure. I have done that before. Do make sure to put a bit of wood in the calipers so you don't have them flying off in dangerous directions. But if you have a compressor, that should make lighter work of getting them out.

Gripping read, by the way. ;)
Triumph Tiger 800XC '12 and a 1994 Ducati 600 SuperSport. - Ex Triumph Tiger 900 T400 1993

January 21, 2021, 01:34:17 PMReply #17 on

Offline Sin_Tiger

  • I have the POWER !
  • Cool Cats
  • Chatty Cathy
  • *
  • Location: Singapore / Scotland
  • Posts: 5869
  • Activity Meter:
    10.44%
  • Max the Moderator
  • Bike model currently owned: Trophy SE - renamed Rhoda the Corroda
There's another screw under the cap that you can only reach with the cap flipped open.

I'd suspect the drain pipe from the filler recess might be blocked and that has at least been in partnership with the spiders, attached is a Tech Article I wrote for the local Classic club that might offer some help, it's not on YT  :icon_lol: Never park your bike near a Land Rover, LR spiders are vicious.

Back filling the drain with release fluid of preference with the tank upside down might help.

I used to have long hair, took acid and went to hip joints. Now I long for hair, take antacid and need a new hip joint

January 21, 2021, 01:37:25 PMReply #18 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
Maybe I'll post the next instalment up later. Don't want to give the game away too early.

What I will say is that I only have a couple of jobs left to get it back on the road (& the fuel tank isn't one of them)  :hat10
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 01:39:57 PMReply #19 on

Offline Sin_Tiger

  • I have the POWER !
  • Cool Cats
  • Chatty Cathy
  • *
  • Location: Singapore / Scotland
  • Posts: 5869
  • Activity Meter:
    10.44%
  • Max the Moderator
  • Bike model currently owned: Trophy SE - renamed Rhoda the Corroda
OOOps  :icon_redface: apologies if I jumped the gun  :new_popcornsmiley
I used to have long hair, took acid and went to hip joints. Now I long for hair, take antacid and need a new hip joint

January 21, 2021, 01:44:10 PMReply #20 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
No apology needed, I could have posted the whole story in one go, but the suspense is killing you  :ImaPoser
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 05:43:42 PMReply #21 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
Back to the fuel cap and I finally got around to looking inside the tank to see what state the underside of the fuel filler cap was in.

I bought a cheap endoscope from eBay which connects to my phone. It works quite well but the wire is a little flimsy. I had to tape the end of the ‘scope to a piece of wooden dowelling I had lying around (that I use to measure the chain slack on my Tiger).

First time I used it, I could barely see a thing, then I realised there was a control near the USB end that allows you to turn up the brightness of the LEDs surrounding the lens.

A picture, in this case, is better than a thousand words. The locking mechanism is covered in what looks like limescale, not that I think that’s what it is, it just looks like it. I tried a bit more duck oil but as the lock has been soaking in a mixture of stale fuel, Duck Oil and WD40 for best part of a week and was still seized, I thought I’d try another trick from that on-line mechanical repository, known as YouTube.

I have an electric sander, so attached a cloth to the base and pressed it to the top of the fuel cap. The theory is that the vibrations will loosen any corrosion and allow you to open it. I tried this for around 5 minutes but the only key I have started to bend, so I stopped.

Next thing to try is to either soak it in diesel or Plusgas.

Meanwhile, more cleaning is needed. More hoovering and more cleaning and the panels came up a treat. I had to remove the internal mouldings to give them a good clean and even without a good polish, they’re in a remarkable condition for 28-year-old plastics.

Next up, removing the nosecone and front mudguard.
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 05:51:13 PMReply #22 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
First job of the day, before getting to grips with the plastics was removing the left brake calliper ready to strip it down. I also intended to clean up both callipers but decided against it for the moment. Instead I removed the nosecone.

This meant first removing the mirrors (two bolts easy) and the indicators. One undid easily, the other required a soaking in Duck Oil for a while to loosen the bolt.

Next, I tried to remove the screen, but found all but two of the allen bolts were stuck solid. I did have to undo two of the screen fixing bolts so I could remove the nose cone but luckily, these were the two that undid easily. Another couple of bolts holding the nosecone to the mounting frame, disconnect the headlight and it was free.

Once on the bench, I managed to remove all the screen bolts bar one with an allen key and a pair of pliers. The final one, I had to cut the rubber away so I could push the screen nut through the fairing. After that, it was down to mole grips to remove the bolt/nut from the screen. Once again, a hoover to remove all trace of spider then a good clean with Muc-Off.

The front mudguard was a similar affair, all but one of the bolts came undone easily, the last one needed persuasion with mole grips again. Luckily, there was no damage to the mudguard and despite there being a lot of oil around where it attached to the shock, it was in just as good a condition as the rest of the bodywork once cleaned up.

Next on my list of jobs for the day was to remove the mounting frame that the nose cone attaches to.

No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 05:54:44 PMReply #23 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
There were many cable ties to cut first (from memory I think around 8) and I had to disconnect a couple of parts of the wiring loom.

There are 4 bolts holding the mounting frame to the bike, two to the headstock and one to each side of the radiator mounting points. All came off with little problem, although I did have to undo the wheel clamp and turn the front wheel a bit to gain access to the bolts on the headstock.

Again, once removed, I gave it a good clean and all the panels together with the mounting frame were stored in the loft in the garage.

Now to the next bit of cleaning. I used Autosol to give the exhaust end cans a bit of a polish, which cleaned up nicely. A little more work and I think they%u2019ll do, aside from the scratches down the right side of the end can. They%u2019re too deep to do anything with but they%u2019re serviceable. I may consider aftermarket exhausts in the long term but for recommissioning, they'll do just fine. That%u2019s more than I can say about the fork stanchions!

They%u2019re both corroded pretty much from top down to the dust seals, which is, i guess why the oil seals leak. Autosol is definitely not going to solve this one. They%u2019re either going to need replacing or re-chroming
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 06:00:46 PMReply #24 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
The last bit of cleaning for today was to clean up the infill panels that surround the cockpit. I have some plastic/rubber reconditioning spray I bought for use on the door/roof seals on the car and used this to clean up the plastic surrounds. As is most of the bike, they were filthy.

My final task for the day was to locate where two pieces of plastic infill panels should go. I had no idea and couldn’t see where they could go when I trial fitted the fairings prior to putting them into storage.

Turns out they are to cover the coil packs on either side of the frame (under the fuel tank). I had to go on-line to Fowlers of Bristol and look at their parts catalogue to identify them. At least now I know, although it took me a while to figure out exactly how they fit.


No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 06:05:41 PMReply #25 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
I needed to figure out what to do with the forks. It was clear that the ones I had were well past their sell by date. Time for some more internet research.

I found I could get 2nd hand forks (with light pitting) around the dust seals for around £100. I could also get pattern parts from Wemoto for £123 each (plus postage) or I could have my existing stanchions hard chromed & guaranteed for 12 months (straightened if required) for £145 for the pair from a company called Dynasurf, a company that specialises in hard chroming and plating, based in Sandbach.

In the end, I opted for having my existing stanchions replated by Dynasurf. I know I could have bought some from eBay cheaper but what’s to say the ‘light pitting’ was not going to damage the oil seal or just rust where the buyer has cleaned them up. For all I know, they may have used Scotchbrite which is abrasive & could damage further, an already iffy surface.

I had to fill up my better half’s car so while at the garage, I also filled up a fuel can with diesel to try to free up the fuel filler cap latch. Armed with a funnel, I have poured approx. 1 litre of diesel into the upturned tank and gave it a good sloshing around to ensure the latch mechanism is nicely covered. Checked with the endoscope to make sure it was fully covered and left it 24 hours to see what happens.

Finally, a name

It was 12th February 2020 and thought it time I gave the Trophy a name. It took some time but I finally decided.

 All my vehicles have names, Lucy SLK, Tallulah (Tiger) Lily and now Tabitha Trophy. Tabitha was a woman raised from the dead by Saint Peter, and while I’m no saint, I am raising her from the dead.

I give you Tabitha Trophy.  :wings

(See, nothing to do with cats  :icon_mrgreen: )
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 06:17:09 PMReply #26 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
A week previously, I’d ordered the front brake seal kits from Wemoto (their eBay shop) and the brake piston pliers, it was time to strip down the callipers. Starting with the right side, I had already split the callipers and easily removed the pistons. Using some degreaser and brake cleaning spray, I cleaned all the gunge off the calliper and took some 0000-gauge wire wool to clean the pistons. All the parts cleaned up nicely with no surprises, except one.

The brake seal kits I received from Wemoto were the wrong ones. The standard 1993 Trophy has 4-pot callipers with two different diameter pistons, the seal kit I was provided had both seals of the same diameter & only two of each, not four.
The first e-mail from Wemoto insisted the seal kits were correct for my bike but after I explained why they were not, a second e-mail requested I return the parts for a full refund.

Now I find this interesting as I paid £32.50 for 2 individual seal kits from their eBay shop, Wemoto.com shows a seal kit for both front callipers for £37. The image that accompanies the kit definitely shows seals of two different diameters and curiously, a different part number to the one I received.

After a few email exchanges and a phone call, Wemoto finally agreed to send me out the correct seal kit (AG2491) as soon as I send the incorrect ones back. I also ordered a seal kit for the rear calliper.

I did little over the weekend anyway as it was too cold out and I didn’t have heating in the garage. Not that all work stopped, I did go out and agitate the diesel in the fuel tank and try to undo the filler cap every so often, still without result. But I kept trying.

I didn’t want to strip the left calliper at the moment as should I forget how I took the right one apart, I’ve got a reference.
I did find time to have a little clean. Nothing too drastic as I didn’t remove anything, just a bottle of cleaner and a damp rag over the wiring, cables and any bits of plastic I could see, such as the air intakes. Still a lot more cleaning to go though.
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 06:20:08 PMReply #27 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

  • Leopard
  • Location: South Lincs
  • Posts: 491
  • Activity Meter:
    7.78%
  • nOObie(ish)
    • My Triumphs & Me
  • LOCATION: Lincolnshire UK
  • Bike model currently owned: 2006 Tiger 955i, 1993 Triumph Trophy
Back to the fuel cap, which was stubbornly refusing to budge. I decided to take yet another stab at it after it had been sitting on the bench, upside down with the underside of the filler cap soaking in diesel for a week.

Every couple of days, well every time I went into the garage anyway, I agitated it a little, just to help things along.
I was hoping this would have done the trick, so I drained out the diesel and was shocked at the state of it. It was a rusty brown colour with solid bits of something in it which I haven’t even tried to identify, but was hoping that the latch was now free enough to be able to open the cap.

Tank now right side up, I carefully insert the new, stronger key into the lock (I had a new one cut just in case I broke the original), I turn the key and it begins to turn through around 70o. Exactly the same as before, still couldn’t open the fuel cap.

Out comes the endoscope and I take a look inside. It doesn’t look any different to the last time I had a look inside.
It seems I’m running out of options.

For my next trick I’m going to try covering the latch in Harpic x10 limescale cleaner. It has a weak solution of hydrochloric acid in it so I’m hoping that whatever is causing the latch to jam will be dissolved. I’ll have to find some way of applying the Harpic to just the latch though, probably a small length of piping and can only leave it for around 10 minutes or it could damage the tank. In the mean time, I wrote to Practical Sportsbike Magazine. They have a ‘Problem’ page. Maybe they can come up with a solution.
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

January 21, 2021, 06:51:18 PMReply #28 on

Offline ghulst

  • Administrator
  • Cheetah
  • *****
  • Location: South-West Netherlands
  • Posts: 525
  • Activity Meter:
    9.33%
  • Roar!
    • arnehulstein.nl
  • LOCATION: Netherlands
  • Bike model currently owned: Triumph Tiger 800 XC '12
No apology needed, I could have posted the whole story in one go, but the suspense is killing you  :ImaPoser
Oh... The suspense!!

Really enjoying the read though.
Triumph Tiger 800XC '12 and a 1994 Ducati 600 SuperSport. - Ex Triumph Tiger 900 T400 1993

January 21, 2021, 10:20:40 PMReply #29 on

Offline Sin_Tiger

  • I have the POWER !
  • Cool Cats
  • Chatty Cathy
  • *
  • Location: Singapore / Scotland
  • Posts: 5869
  • Activity Meter:
    10.44%
  • Max the Moderator
  • Bike model currently owned: Trophy SE - renamed Rhoda the Corroda
I've never seen a cap latch quite that bad before  :icon_eek:

The early Trophys were fitted with the Nissin 27mm two pot sliding calipers and solid discs (often referred to as "B Spec") on the front the same as those fitted to the Tridents and Steamers, same as the one on the rear. The Nissin four pots and floating discs (often referred to as "A Spec") the same as the Daytonas were fitted quite early in production and might even have been an option. If they are correct for the period they will have "Nissin" the raised marking cast into the body, later (after '95 I think) they used the same caliper but it had "Triumph" logo raised on the casting. You have to be a bit careful with used replacements as there were two variants of the "Triumph" branded item, one had an 85mm fork mounting hole spacing and the other had a 90mm, the Mk1 Trophy should be 90mm same as the Mk2. I don't know what bikes had the 85mm for sure but I suspect the 955's as the T300 43mm Kayaba / Showa fork bottoms were very similar.

Great naming logic, a bit more interesting than my CAT theory  ;) I had a pristine seat but it went to a chap in Germany recently.

 :new_popcornsmiley
I used to have long hair, took acid and went to hip joints. Now I long for hair, take antacid and need a new hip joint

 


SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal