Author Topic: Tabitha 1200  (Read 4006 times)

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January 26, 2021, 06:12:31 PMReply #60 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

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The bog roll hoarders were at it again, DIY shops were reporting a surge in the sales of paint, Hairdressers were going into meltdown across the country and 007 finally met his match (RIP Sean Connery).

Yes, Lockdown 2 happened in November 2020

It was a strange week where lots happened but sadly very little in the garage. I was still waiting for both the carbs and the forks to come back from their respective repairs.

Not so much as a finger was laid on Tabitha for what seemed like weeks - but planning what jobs remained continued. As you can probably guess, I have a project file (good old Excel) and as at 1st November 2020, the free Trophy has cost £873.00. With all the bits I've still to do, you can add another £1000.00 so in all, it looked like my free bike was going to cost around £1900, probably a little more when you add in bits I'd forgotten to list. At this point, I still had the following jobs to do (in no particular order):
  • refit carbs
  • refit throttle cable
  • refit choke cable
  • refit air box
  • refit air intakes
  • re-assemble front forks
  • Refurbish wheels
  • Replace tyres
  • refit wheels
  • refit speedo cable
  • replace chain & sprocket
  • Oil change (inc filter)
  • coolant change
  • refit brake callipers
  • replace brake lines
  • replace brake pads
  • bleed brakes
  • replace petcock
  • refit tank
  • balance carbs
  • refit bodywork
  • connect lights
  • replace seat
I’d ordered a new chain and sprocket from M&P, engine and fork oil from Opie Oils and a clutch and front sprocket cover gasket set from Sprint Manufacturing. 

Why the gaskets? The Trophy engine is odd in that the cover over the front sprocket has oil circulating through it, don't know why. it just does, so a gasket set is needed for that.

As the clutch is still an unknown and because the bike has been standing for so long, while the engine oil has been drained, I'll whip the clutch out to check it thoroughly and to give it a good soak before refitting it, just to be sure.

What happened next at this point was still up in the air. Coming up to Christmas I suspected my budget would be swallowed up by that, and as I expected to be out of work from 1st January 2021, money would be at the forefront of my mind, as in ‘would I have any?’.

Yes, I was expecting a little redundancy money but that had to pay the mortgage and other living expenses until I could find work and in the current Covid-19 climate, that might not have been as easy as I'd like.

2021 could be interesting   :^_^


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January 26, 2021, 08:16:08 PMReply #61 on

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It was a bit  :icon_eek: but luckily we weren't out in the wilds. I just called the Bikebulance (yes they really did call themselves that  :icon_lol:) and retired to the shop across the road to enjoy roti prata and chicken curry  :wings

I couldn't find my photos of the rubber flap mod, I might post that as a separate thread when I do. In fact the lost screw might well be worthy of a separate thread.
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January 27, 2021, 01:16:31 PMReply #62 on

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What happened next at this point was still up in the air. Coming up to Christmas I suspected my budget would be swallowed up by that, and as I expected to be out of work from 1st January 2021, money would be at the forefront of my mind, as in ‘would I have any?’.

Yes, I was expecting a little redundancy money but that had to pay the mortgage and other living expenses until I could find work and in the current Covid-19 climate, that might not have been as easy as I'd like.

2021 could be interesting   :^_^


Man, that sounds devastating. Hope the redundancy hasn't worked out that way, or that you have been able to find something else by now...
Triumph Tiger 800XC '12 and a 1994 Ducati 600 SuperSport. - Ex Triumph Tiger 900 T400 1993

January 27, 2021, 05:43:00 PMReply #63 on

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The best laid plans, and all that – just as well I don’t rely too much on plans as over the last few weeks of 2020 a lot changed. Firstly, my impending redundancy was moved back to June 2021, giving me a further 6 months of work, it has meant moving jobs but still with the same employer, I’ll just finish a little later than planned.

At the end of December and just in time for Christmas, we went into what can only be described as another lockdown, cancelling Christmas get togethers for almost the entire country. But life goes on and so did work in the garage.
I spent a good weekend working on Tabitha and could see the end in sight. The first items to come back were the fork stanchions from Dynasurf.  

Putting the forks back together was almost straightforward and would have been finished in a couple of hours if I’d had enough fork oil. I ordered some from Opie Oils, taking advantage of 5% discount from my Triumph Motorcycle Owners Club (TOMCC) membership. I’d done some research online and in the workshop manual to find out how much I needed but all I could find was what the air gap was with the fork fully compressed and with the spring removed (10.5mm) but nowhere could I find the volume needed. I knew the Tiger took just over 1L but a check on the owner’s forums suggested it was less.

So, I ordered 1L together with 5L engine oil. Turns out each fork took approximately 600ml so I had to wait while another 1L was ordered and delivered from Sportsbikeshop in Boston. Aside from that, they went back on the bike without drama.

While I was waiting, I received a message from Ben at BJM to say my carbs were ready. When I was told the cost, I was gobsmacked. I knew he had to order a new cap, have an emulsion tube made up, replace a few seals and I’d also asked him to order a brake lever pivot bolt. I was expecting a bill of around £250. All that work, including parts came to £130. Bonus, I still had £120 in the budget, so I ordered some new brake lines from Wezmoto in Exeter.

Now things are really moving in the garage. First job was to replace the chain & sprocket. To do this, I had to remove the sprocket cover which, because of Triumph’s designers, meant having to drain the oil from the engine. I was going to change the oil anyway, so it wasn't an issue.

The oil filler is incorporated in to the sprocket cover, which is a STUPID design, much like having to remove the carbs to replace the air filter. To get access to all the cover bolts, I had to remove the side stand, which meant having to remove the gear linkage, which meant removing the foot peg, which meant removing one of the engine mounting bolts, which as you’d expect was a pain in the a$$ as it was behind the rear suspension unit. WHAT WERE THEY THINKING?

So, oil drained, sprocket cover removed and there in all its glory was the remains of a very large spider, lots of old congealed oil and some grease.

Now you may recall that I’d cut the old chain off when I was replacing the rear shock & drag link. I’d also removed the rear sprocket from the wheel. This was not good as I had no way to loosen the front sprocket nut.

Luckily and despite a recent trip to the recycling centre, I still had the old chain & sprocket, so I put the sprocket back on the wheel and put it back on the bike. I also put the chain back on, holding it together with a couple of cable ties. A piece of wood between the wheel, resting on the swing arm, locked the rear wheel in place and a rattle gun got the sprocket nut off in less time than took me to type this sentence. I used the same method to hold the sprocket and rear wheel still when I put the new sprocket on later & torqued it down.

Earlier in the year, I’d been to my local pound shop as they were selling brake cleaner for, well, a pound. It’s not top quality and I probably wouldn’t use it to clean brake parts, but it’s far better than the engine degreaser that they also sold for degreasing parts. The sprocket cover used up a good half a canto get rid of years of built up oil and grease.

While the oil was drained, I thought I’d look at the clutch. I’d done the hydraulics a while ago, rebuilding the master cylinder and bleeding the system, but the clutch plates were an unknown.

With the bike having done 17,000 miles, I didn’t think the clutch plates would be worn, but they may have been a little sticky because of years of sitting around. I had to order a gasket set for the sprocket cover, so had the foresight to also order a clutch cover gasket at the same time from Sprint manufacturing. This was a nice easy job, not like the sprocket cover and the whole job was done in less than an hour. Turns out the clutch plates were in great shape, so a quick clean and a soak in fresh oil before reassembling it was all that was needed.

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January 28, 2021, 05:45:00 PMReply #64 on

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Next to go back on was the carbs. I thought it would be a nice quick job, connect up the throttle cable, the choke cable then ease them on to the rubbers. The first part of the job was easy but trying to get them back on the rubbers was another of those jobs that never goes according to plan. In the end, I was getting a little grumpy after almost an hour of trying, so left them until the following day. To be fair, I had been in the garage for over 8 hours by that time, so probably needed a break anyway.

The next morning, and with an application of some spray silicon lubricant, the carbs slid into place within 5 minutes. The air box took a little longer as the rubber seals are oval in shape and, so I found out, if they’re not positioned correctly, just won’t fit. Again, a quick spray of silicon and repositioning the rubber seals on the air box and they just slid into place. 

I now had the carbs and air box fitted, the front shocks and wheel fitted and the clutch done. It was time for the coolant to be replaced. Shock horror, Triumph actually put drain screws in their 1200 engine., one at the pump and one half way down the side of the cylinder block – a good bit of design from them. The whole job took less than half hour. Another one ticked off the list.

It was time to trial fit the bodywork. Not that I was expecting it to not fit, but I had a bag full of new bolts and I wanted to see how it all went together. Besides, I hadn’t really seen Tabitha with her clothes on, so to speak.

First up, the nose cone and screen. No issues there although I needed to look at the wiring behind the nosecone to ensure nothing was catching when I turned the steering. A few adjustments needed but nothing serious.

Next, the rear fairing. This was easy as and was only four bolts. It did show up one rubber gromet was missing, so one of those needed to be ordered.

Next, the side fairings. Most of the bolts were easy to fix, but there were some issues. The fixings under the fairing, that hold the two halves together had no bolts, or rather the bolts I had, didn’t fit. The lower fixing on the front right seemed to have been cross threaded at some point as the bolt won’t do up and on the left side the lower rear fixing also didn’t do up. I removed the fairings again to sort them out.

Finally, there are plastic trim panels around the front of the steering stem and down to the top of the side panels. There are 6 fixing points and I didn’t have any bolts that fit. As the trim panels are black, it probably needed black bolts, so I sourced some from that well known auction site. Much like the bolts that hold the two halves of the fairing together, I didn’t have the correct sizes in the fairing bolt kit I purchased, so they also came from eBay.

 The ‘To-do’ list was getting smaller.




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January 28, 2021, 05:59:17 PMReply #65 on

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Wow, that rear wheel looks small and far away in that picture. Never thought the wheelbase would be that long. ;)
Triumph Tiger 800XC '12 and a 1994 Ducati 600 SuperSport. - Ex Triumph Tiger 900 T400 1993

January 28, 2021, 07:34:44 PMReply #66 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

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Would be good for drag racing with that wheelbase + the 1200 engine.

Now there's a thought  :icon_scratch:
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January 28, 2021, 11:20:36 PMReply #67 on

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Fortunately the end cans on your model, however heavy they might be, are the chrome sleeved type, which means you can drill out the rivets, do any weld repairs that might be needed, re-chrome the sleeves as needed and rivet them back together. The very early type, fitted to the Daytona's also, were one piece and completely chromed, no longer available and if you have to repair them, no chrome facility I've asked will touch them as the contaminants in the wadding (which can't be removed) destroys their chemical baths  :icon_frown:
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January 29, 2021, 02:08:19 PMReply #68 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

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That's good to know, although I might replace them at some point.

Having said that, I always intended to replace the original cans on my Blackbird, but after 13 years ownership, I never actually got around to doing it.
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January 29, 2021, 05:39:50 PMReply #69 on

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Well, in the coming 13 years you might use Niall's advice then. ;)
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January 29, 2021, 06:47:11 PMReply #70 on

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I admit it, I splashed out and dipped in to the following months bike budget. Being off work between Christmas and New Year and not being able to travel anywhere allowed me to get a few more jobs done.

My Trophy has ‘brewers droop’, so said Practical Sportsbike magazine when they did their Resto SOS piece a few months back.
Let me explain. Both riders foot pegs were broken, something which I had in hand, sort of, well, the foot pegs were on my to-do list anyway, but at £35+ each to replace, I just needed my employer to top up my bank account before I ordered some. That was after ordering a petcock and fuel tap knob and a few other bits.

Then eBay intervened and sent me an email for a seller who sold generic foot pegs at a very reasonable £6.19 a pair. They looked ok and for that price, I thought I’d give them a go. They arrived within a couple of days and then sat in the garage while the snow melted & the garage warmed up a bit.

I finally got around to fitting them and all seemed well, I had already measured the originals to ensure the new ones were the same size, and they were.

What wasn’t the same size was the hole in them where the pin goes through to secure them to the bike, nor were the pins. The original pins were 10mm diameter, the new ones 8mm and 5mm longer. The upshot of this was the new pins fell straight through the holes in the mount. I couldn’t use the old pins because the hole in the foot peg was also 8mm – or could I? 

It took me longer to get my drill out and find where I’d put my 10mm drill bit than it did to drill the hole out in the new foot peg. Using the original pins, it was a 10-minute job to fit the new foot pegs to the bike. Another job ticked off the to-do list.

I was originally going to order the petcock and knob from Sprint Manufacturing, the trouble was by the time I had sufficient funds they didn’t have any stock left. This turned out to be a good thing. Fowlers of Bristol had them in stock and while they were a couple of quid more, there was no postage, so they ended up costing me less. On top of that, the original knob I was going to order from Sprint Manufacturing was £35, ok it was aluminium rather than plastic but the Fowlers plastic one was considerably cheaper, so I saved money in the long run. How long the plastic fuel tap will last is debatable and I may end up buying an aluminium one in the long run.

During November 2020, I thought it an idea to get a few quotes from local businesses that can refurbish the wheels. there's a few in Peterborough, not too far from me, so I fired off a couple of emails asking for quotes. I got nothing back from either of them. A call out to local TOMCC members gave me a recommendation for wheelrite-online.co.uk who came back very quickly with a quote of £70 + VAT  per wheel.

As it’s been cold and wet, it felt like I did very little in the last few weeks of 2020. What I did do was strip the old, ripped cover off the seat to see what condition the foam was in. It looked good enough to  cover with a seat cover, or I can buy a 2nd hand seat. Both are around £75.

 In the end, a fellow member of TOMCC came to my aid and sold me a spare one he had lying around for £40, picked up the day before we went into yet another lockdown.

It's off a 1996 Trophy and is a slightly different profile to the original, but it looks good and all for £40.

I also cleaned up the rear brake disc and measured its thickness. It’s 5.7mm and the minimum thickness is 5.0mm, so once I’ve sorted the wheels, I’ll use it, rather than replace it. I also cleaned up the front brake discs. Again, they’re well within the minimum thickness (4.5mm). 

So there appears to be very little I can do until I get the wheels refurbished. I considered spraying them myself, I also considered using a local bodyshop to spray them, but rather than rush things, getting them powder coated is probably the best idea. The thing is, I can't get them to the Powder coaters until lockdown eases. Having spent February's budget on a set of Pirelli Angel ST tyres and a complete set of bearings for the front and rear wheels, there's nothing left in the budget until March anyway.

And that just about brings us up to date. There are probably a couple of little jobs I can find to do and I'll update you when I do them, but for now...


WATCH THIS SPACE

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January 29, 2021, 06:50:28 PMReply #71 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

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Just a few photos that may or may not have already been shared.

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January 30, 2021, 12:51:04 PMReply #72 on

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That seat... Makes you wonder whether the Tasmanian Devil was the previous owner. ;)

Good to be up to date, but I am going to miss the daily updates. ;)
Triumph Tiger 800XC '12 and a 1994 Ducati 600 SuperSport. - Ex Triumph Tiger 900 T400 1993

January 31, 2021, 03:19:27 AMReply #73 on

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The Mk2 seat results in about 10mm lower seat height and is a little more comfortable for longer rides in my opinion, the early ones are getting harder to find, cat issues I believe  ;) worth holding onto the old base.

Having a similar issue getting my wheels done, bit the bullet in the end and got them collected & shipped by Parcel Force fully insured for £12 which is probably not a lot different from what it would cost me for the 80 miles round trip to drive them anyway and I wouldn't be tempted to stop for a technically illegal Espresso  :augie

I'm impressed with you getting your carbs done for that price  :thumbsup it's almost worth me shipping mine down to him  ;)

Trevor is quite reasonable for his prices, I suppose he has to be competitive but his shipping costs are the only thing I take issue with and they're sometimes inconsistent i.e. larger stuff being shipped inclusive but a couple of gaskets cost £4.95  :icon_scratch:
I used to have long hair, took acid and went to hip joints. Now I long for hair, take antacid and need a new hip joint

January 31, 2021, 08:48:43 AMReply #74 on

Offline Lee337 (OP)

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A quick update:

I'ce held on to the old seat base and at some point will get a new cover for it. Top Sellerie do them for around £70, but post Brexit, this may have changed as they're in France. Always good to have a spare though.

The new wheel bearings turned up in the post yesterday (Saturday) and are sittiong o a shelf in the garage, along with brake discs, pads, fluid and a few assorted nuts & bolts, ready to put everything together.

I had the battery charged and turned the engine over the other day and everything seems in good order. The exhaust gives out quite a nice thumping sound, so I'm looking forward to the day I start her for the first time. This won't be for a while as I 'm going to wait until the wheels are back on - don't want to damage the chain/sprocket as I'm sure there'll be clutch drag, or even hace the chain jump off the front sprocket.

I took my wheels to BJM (the same guy who did my carbs) yesterday to get the tyres and old sprockets removed. With tyre disposal, he charged £60, which I thought was a bit steep, until I remembered he'll get charged £5 a tyre for disposal (my brother used to work for a tyre distributor & that was their charge for car tyres, so I assume bike tyres are the same). I know his going rate is £35 per hour, and I know he under charged me for the carbs, so it all works out about right.

The old tyres were so stiff, it took him 20 minutes just to get the rear one off, I sat there & watched him struggle for about 15 minutes before I left him to it.

So now, all that's left, fingers crossed, is to get the wheels powder coated (the company I'm using will fit the new tyres) and finally puttign the whole bike together.

Then we'll see if she starts. I'm going to video it when I get there & will post it up, but it won't be for a while, February's bike budget is now non-existent.
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

 


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